1. departured:

    my greatest talent is being able to watch 5 years worth of a tv show in one week

    (via confessionsofacastmember)

     
  2. ccoastal:

    hanars:

    luckykrys:

    thecreach:

    luckykrys:

    "Anne Bonny and Mary Read were pirates, as renowned for their ruthlessness as for their gender, and during their short careers challenged the sailors’ adage that a woman’s presence on shipboard invites bad luck."

    Sculpture by Erik Christianson.

    I’m not entirely sure that the statue really needed to have a tit out.

    Actually I’ve seen this before and I can tell you— it’s because these women were bad ass pirates and when they killed someone they’d expose one or both breasts so that when their victim died, (s)he knew that they were killed by a woman.

    ACTUALLY Anne Bonny purposely wore loose fitting clothes and displayed her breasts openly at all times during battle - mainly because men were distracted by them, and she took pleasure in killing said men while they were too busy staring at her breasts. Mary Read dressed mainly as a man (after posing as her deceased brother, Mark, for the entirety of her childhood) and both ladies cross-dressed from time to time, hopping between ships. They were known as the ‘fierce hell cats’ due to their ferocious tempers, and were key elements to Captain ‘Calico Jack’ Rackham’s crew - they were the only two known female pirates in the Golden Age of Caribbean piracy. IN FACT, when the ship was captured by the British Navy, Anne and Mary were the ONLY TWO pirates who fought while the males of the crew hid - they were all tried to be hung as pirates but Bonny and Read were both pregnant and were pardoned.

    Calico Jack was a lover to Bonny, and as he was to be hung, Bonny’s final words to him were, “Had you fought like a man, you need not be hung like a dog.” Bonny and Read were possibly two of the most badass fucking pirates and they were FEMALE. The more you know. 

    (via jessicasheaspotswood)

     
  3. (Source: noartinside, via heathicorn)

     
  4. ❤❤ BETHYL

    (Source: darling-reedus, via ohdaryld)

     

  5. leahclifford:

    Most of you guys heard through twitter and fb, but yesterday my left eye basically stopped blinking. When I smiled, only the right side of my mouth moved. Needless to say, it was pretty terrifying. When I got to the Emergency Room, they diagnosed Bell’s Palsy, but had to rule…

     
  6.  
  7. Christ.

    (Source: monsieurcouture, via smokin-guys)

     
  8.  

    1. Me: But I have about fifty books at home I haven't read, there's no reason for me to buy these.
    2. My brain: Okay, but consider this: more books.
     

  9. "Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know."
    — 

    Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

    OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

    Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

    Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

    Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

    Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

    Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

    Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

    Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

    (via bansheewhale)

    (via artsymusingsofabibliophile)